Tag Archives: garden

Spring transforms nature

Last week, while I was taking my daughter for a walk, I randomly noticed this small offshoot on our pecan tree so I rushed to grab my camera and take photos. At the same time I was playing peekaboo with my daughter to keep her occupied. We both enjoyed the activity!

offshoot of a pecan tree in spring

I have to say, it is amazing how the same object looks so different if you shoot it at a different angle and perspective when combined  with the lighting conditions, the direction of  light, the background and your position.

offshoot of a pecan tree in spring

I think that the photos above are a representative example. All of them were taken on the same day and time.

Clivia Miniata

Clivia miniata (Natal lily, bush lily) is a species of flowering plant in the genus Clivia of the family Amaryllidaceae, native to South Africa. It is a popular plant for shaded areas, which grows into large clumps; it doesn’t need much water and is normally cultivated as a houseplant.

red Clivia miniata flowers - Natal lily, bush lily

Clivia miniata flowers are red, orange or yellow and they stay in bloom longer than most flowers. They can be used as cut flowers as well. Just keep in mind that they contain small amounts of lycorine, making it poisonous.

red Clivia miniata flowers - Natal lily, bush lily

These beautiful Clivia miniata flowers bloomed the past few days in our garden.  I pass by them everyday but somehow I didn’t have the urge to photograph them.  After a long consideration, I decided  that I should take some photos for my portfolio.  And I’m glad I did. The results were really rewarding!


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A beautiful flower

It’s really impressive that, this year our garden has more species of  wildflowers than before, such as the Wild Garlic, Allium Ampeloprasum, Muscari Parviflorum, Gladiolus Italicus, Narcissus Tazetta, Cyclamen Persicum and, last but not least, this beautiful flower called Gynandriris Sisyrinchium.

Barbary Nut, Moraea Sisyrinchium, Gynandriris Sisyrinchium

Barbary Nut is the common name of Gynandriris Sisyrinchium (syn. Moraea Sisyrinchium) which  is native to the Mediterranean region. The flowers don’t open unless the day is warm and often not until late afternoon and they do not last very long.

Barbary Nut, Moraea Sisyrinchium, Gynandriris Sisyrinchium
Gynandriris Sisyrinchium (Barbary Nut) | by karafc

Don’t think that I became a flower expert all of a sudden. Quite  recently, I found  a book in my mom’s library called The Medical Flowers of Cyprus. It is a wealth of information about the flora of Cyprus, so finally I can gather information easier 🙂

My grandpa’s gift

My grandpa is a retired fisherman and one of the many things he liked to do was to collect sea conch shells that were caught in his fishing nets. He would then proceed to dry them under the sun, then he would clean them thoroughly and display them on shelves. He is very proud of his big collection and he happily gives conch shells to family and friends as a gift.

grandpa

At first, we didn’t know what to do with the numerous conch shells that he gave us but in the end we realized that we could repurpose them  instead of keeping them as decorative pieces only. And therefore we transformed them into pots for small cactuses and other succulent plants.

Needless to say that my grandpa is very pleased that we found a creative way to use his gifts instead of  keeping his conch shells hidden in a drawer.


This post is part of the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Repurpose

Wild garlic

In a cactus pot in our garden a wild garlic has sprouted and its beautiful white flower drew my attention. I had to shoot it several times because it was windy for a few days but since I knew what I was looking for, I could gather up information easier.

Allium ursinum is a wild relative of chives native to Europe and Asia. It is known as ramsons, buckrams, wild garlic, broad-leaved garlic, wood garlic, bear leek, or bear’s garlic.

Wild garlic leaves are edible and they can be used as salad, herb,  boiled as a vegetable, in soup or as an ingredient for a sauce. The bulbs and flowers are also edible.

The leaves are also used as fodder. Cows that have fed on ramsons give milk that tastes slightly of garlic.

Despite the fact that I don’t like eating or using garlic in my cooking, it is a beautiful plant and beautifies our garden.